Living and Dealing with Bipolar Disorder

Learn how I beat Depression

When the doctor diagnoses you with bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, this can be a frightening, difficult, stressful experience and one that can influence your entire life.  In order to cope well with your loved ones, at work, friends or in social situations, is it important to understand and be involved in your treatment.

Patients should try to live a balanced lifestyle with regular daily activity patters including physical activities, eating, social activities, and sleeping.  Avoid late day heavy meals and drinks containing caffeine such as cola, tea or coffee.  Keep a regular bedtime routine by going to bed and getting up at around the same time daily. If your sleep patterns start to change, it could signal a bipolar disorder mood episode so talk to your doctor about these changes.

When dealing with bipolar disorder, it is important to educate yourself and make knowledgeable choices about drugs and alcohol and the affect they could have on your life.  Over fifty percent of bipolar disorder patients have drug or alcohol abuse problems, which could interfere with their bipolar medications and increase the chance of suicide.  Take prescription drugs for this disorder as directed and stay away from any illegal or street drugs.

Creating a support system that includes loved ones, friends, doctors, therapist, co-workers, support groups and clergy could help a bipolar disorder patient avoid problems when they have an episode.  People in the support system can remind the patient to take their medication or keep doctor appointments.  Have a contact list with names and telephone numbers of people to contact depending upon the situation and be sure a family member has a copy.

Dealing with bipolar disorder often makes coping in the workplace difficult but there are ways to manage or avoid workplace stresses that could trigger an episode.  Be sure to get sufficient sleep, regular exercise and eat balanced, nutritious meals.  If your mood symptoms are making it difficult at work, talk to your therapist, healthcare provider and/or boss.  Talk with your psychiatrist or mental health professionals about your condition, situation, yourself and relationships.  Psychotherapy is an important part of dealing with bipolar disorder because it provides support, education, honest feedback, and teaches you about your relationships with family and others, in a private, safe setting.  Many types of therapy are available, so discuss them with your healthcare provider to find those most suitable for your situation.

Learn how I beat Depression

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