Dealing With Travel Anxiety With The Help Of Friends

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Travel is inherently stressful. The more “established” you are wherever you currently lead your live, the more you “give up” when you travel somewhere far away, the more difficult travel becomes.

Many of us remember how easy travel used to be when we were young. We could quit our jobs whenever the mood struck us. With few possessions, without obligations to work or family, surrounded by a group of similar-minded friends, we could set off at a moment’s notice.

It is often a surprise to find oneself, for the first time, a sufferer of travel anxiety. When an older person sets out to travel for the first time in a long time, that surprise can be very unpleasant. Family men and women, with established jobs, typically find that the free-and-easy lifestyle of the past is no more when they plan their first trip abroad as “adults.” The onset of travel anxiety is typically one of the first signs that one is no longer young and that, in itself, can be alarming. It can even increase the anxiety.

What are typically sources of worry for people about to undertake a long trip? In fact, long trips present many sources of worry. The prospect of planning something that is perceived as complicated is worrisome. So is threat of what will happen to one’s house, children, or pets while one is away. Travelling with children, of course, presents its own set of logistical problems that can seem intimidating if one has never done it before. We worry about not being able to find our hotels, about being cheated and robbed by people who don’t speak our language, about getting sick abroad and having to deal with foreign medical infrastructure, and–paradoxically–about not being able to have a good time during the trip, because of worrying too much.

Fortunately, there is one simple way to reduce travel anxiety and simplify the process of travel: get your friends to help you plan the trip. Often, it is much easier to plan for something if you are not deeply personally invested in the success of the plan. Your friends probably want the trip to go well for you. At the same time, they’re not paralysed by fear the way you probably are. They have a moreĀ  realistic view of your trip and its likely outcome. They know that, statistically speaking, you’ll probably have an enjoyable time. A major disaster befalling you during the course of your travel is highly improbable.

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