Cardiac patients who are suffering the effects of depression, The Bright Side is Looking Good

Learn how I beat Depression

Cardiac patients who are suffering the effects of depression can change their state of affairs by ‘looking on the bright side’ according to scientists from Duke University Medical Centre. Over a 15 year survival study on the outcomes of heart patients, it is now understood that a mental attitude that exudes optimism and positivity is as effective as medicine, even taking into account the severity of their condition.

The author of the new lead study, John barefoot PHD has noted how the uniqueness of their study is based on demonstrating the ‘double impact’ of the attitude of the individual patient in the recovery phase. Getting back into the swing of things and returning into some semblance of a normal lifestyle were key effects of adopting such an attitude. A positive outlook doubly improves survival chances over the long haul improving long term health.

Their study involved the cataloging of 2,800 heart patient progress post leaving hospital. Taking patients who had their blood flow in the heart analysed through coronary angiography, the study encountered the astounding results. Previous studies of course have gauged how expectations held by patients influence recovery, yet the findings that longevity and physical health is improved through positive expectancy and attitude, is a new finding.
Psychological questionnaires were filled in by the 2,800 patients where their own expectations were catalogued with regard to their recovery and return to normal. The long term assessment has shown that in the 15 years since the survey was conducted 1,637 of these patients have passed away, with 54% of that number from cardiovascular disease.
Barefoot PHD said: “We know there is a relationship between depression and increased rates of mortality. These findings demonstrate the magnitude of the impact of patient expectations on the recovery process above and beyond depression and other psychological or social factors.”

Those who had shown a higher expectancy and positive attitude towards recovery showed a significantly better survival rate, and lasted longer than those who didn’t. There are several things that favour them according to the authors of the survey. The positive people showed a better instance of compliance with their treatment recommendations and schedule, whilst the ‘pessimism’ displayed by many was rewarded with damage to their health.

Learn how I beat Depression

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*