Bipolar Cause: What Causes Bipolar Disorder?

Learn how I beat Depression

Throughout the twentieth century, well into today, medical science has sought to learn the cause of bipolar disorder, otherwise known as manic-depressive disorder. Understanding the cause of this serious mental illness could prove to be the first step towards prevention and eventual cure.

Many studies, using many different methodologies, have been published about bipolar during the last 50 years. So, bipolar disorder still lacks a cure. However, there is a consensus in the medical and mental health profession: bipolar disorder has several different causes, rather than just one. Many different factors can combine to produce the chemical imbalance in the brain that is responsible for the wild mood swings of bipolar disorder.

Out of these many factors, genetics is the big one. Twins and sibling studies have shown that bipolar disorder tends to run in the family. Individuals are far more likely to develop bipolar disorder if their family has a history of the illness. A person whose identical twin sibling is affected with the disorder is still more likely to develop it.

However, if genetic factors were the sole cause of bipolar disorder, this research would be much more simple than it is. The fact is, genetic factors are not the sole cause of bipolar disorder. If they were, then identical twins would always evince symptoms of the disorder together. Identical twins possess exact replicas of one another’s DNA. Yet, it is possible for one twin to develop bipolar disorder, and for the twin’s sibling to lead a completely normal life at the same time. That sibling is more likely to develop the disorder, true, but he or she is by no means guaranteed to develop the disorder.

Evidence points to the fact that bipolar disorder is cause by a combination of different genes, plus a combination of different environmental factors. Now that the human genome has been mapped, scientists are able to use highly advance tools to determine the precise combination of genes that contributes to bipolar disorder.

As for the environmental factors that lead to bipolar disorder in susceptible individuals, these include stress, psychological and physical hardship, as well as, potentially, imbalances in the diet. Often, stressful incidents trigger a latent susceptibility to bipolar disorder. This is complicated by the fact that what may be stressful to some people is less stressful to others. Thus, no one set of environmental factors is guaranteed to bring about manic-depression, even among individuals who are genetically predisposed to it.

Learn how I beat Depression

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*